Get Email Updates

Take Action

Featured Voice

Our Kids Are Watching Melissa Bickel
Pence: ‘I will not support any bill that diminishes religious freedom’ January 12, 2016 Source: RTV6

CLICK HERE to read the full article and watch Governor Pence’s full State of the State address on RTV6.

By Jordan Fischer

Pence has said for months he was “studying” the issue of expanding statewide civil rights protections to LGBT Hoosiers – a move already taken via local ordinance by a number of cities, including Carmel, Anderson and Pence’s hometown of Columbus.

The governor framed the debate to legislators as a conflict between his belief that “no one should be harassed or mistreated because of who they are, who they love, or what they believe,” and the “faith and the freedom to live out their faith” that Hoosiers cherish.

“The question before you as the elected representatives of the people of Indiana is whether it is necessary or even possible to reconcile these two values in the law without compromising the freedoms we hold dear,” Pence said.

If the issues are indeed irreconcilable, Pence made clear where he would come down on the issue.

“Our constitution not only protects the ‘right to worship Almighty God … according to the dictates of (our) own consciences,’ but, it also provides that ‘No law shall, in any case whatever, control the free exercise and enjoyment of religious opinions, nor interfere with the rights of conscience,'” Pence said.

Freedom Indiana, one of the main proponents of expanding civil rights protections to LGBT Hoosiers, issued a statement following Pence’s address calling it a “complete letdown.”

“In his speech tonight, after 10 months of allegedly listening to Hoosiers, Governor Pence chose to punt the critical issue of civil rights protections for gay and transgender people to Indiana lawmakers,” said campaign manager Chris Paulsen. “We are disappointed in his lack of leadership on an update that we know a majority of people in our state support.”

Pence has said for months he was “studying” the issue of expanding statewide civil rights protections to LGBT Hoosiers – a move already taken via local ordinance by a number of cities, including Carmel, Anderson and Pence’s hometown of Columbus.

The governor framed the debate to legislators as a conflict between his belief that “no one should be harassed or mistreated because of who they are, who they love, or what they believe,” and the “faith and the freedom to live out their faith” that Hoosiers cherish.

“The question before you as the elected representatives of the people of Indiana is whether it is necessary or even possible to reconcile these two values in the law without compromising the freedoms we hold dear,” Pence said.

If the issues are indeed irreconcilable, Pence made clear where he would come down on the issue.

“Our constitution not only protects the ‘right to worship Almighty God … according to the dictates of (our) own consciences,’ but, it also provides that ‘No law shall, in any case whatever, control the free exercise and enjoyment of religious opinions, nor interfere with the rights of conscience,'” Pence said.

Freedom Indiana, one of the main proponents of expanding civil rights protections to LGBT Hoosiers, issued a statement following Pence’s address calling it a “complete letdown.”

“In his speech tonight, after 10 months of allegedly listening to Hoosiers, Governor Pence chose to punt the critical issue of civil rights protections for gay and transgender people to Indiana lawmakers,” said campaign manager Chris Paulsen. “We are disappointed in his lack of leadership on an update that we know a majority of people in our state support.”

Pence has said for months he was “studying” the issue of expanding statewide civil rights protections to LGBT Hoosiers – a move already taken via local ordinance by a number of cities, including Carmel, Anderson and Pence’s hometown of Columbus.

The governor framed the debate to legislators as a conflict between his belief that “no one should be harassed or mistreated because of who they are, who they love, or what they believe,” and the “faith and the freedom to live out their faith” that Hoosiers cherish.

“The question before you as the elected representatives of the people of Indiana is whether it is necessary or even possible to reconcile these two values in the law without compromising the freedoms we hold dear,” Pence said.

If the issues are indeed irreconcilable, Pence made clear where he would come down on the issue.

“Our constitution not only protects the ‘right to worship Almighty God … according to the dictates of (our) own consciences,’ but, it also provides that ‘No law shall, in any case whatever, control the free exercise and enjoyment of religious opinions, nor interfere with the rights of conscience,'” Pence said.

Freedom Indiana, one of the main proponents of expanding civil rights protections to LGBT Hoosiers, issued a statement following Pence’s address calling it a “complete letdown.”

“In his speech tonight, after 10 months of allegedly listening to Hoosiers, Governor Pence chose to punt the critical issue of civil rights protections for gay and transgender people to Indiana lawmakers,” said campaign manager Chris Paulsen. “We are disappointed in his lack of leadership on an update that we know a majority of people in our state support.”